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Catalogue Blog

Joe’s Movement Emporium: Bringing Arts to Life in Prince George’s County

Joe’s Movement Emporium is proud to be included in the Catalogue. This nonprofit is open year round for classes, rehearsals, performances, and arts education programs. Joe’s is a hub of cultural and community activity; it’s the largest independent performing arts center in Prince George’s County. Joe’s is a safe after-school haven for youth, offering arts activities that nurture self-confidence and self-esteem.

Recently, WHUR-TV’s Artico program stopped by and interviewed Neena Narayanan, the organization’s marketing director. Click on this YouTube video and go to 12:00 to see what makes Joe’s so special.

The Grassroots Project Coach Spotlight

Lucia Rose is a senior Track and Field & Cross Country athlete at American University and a volunteer at The Grassroot Project (TGP), part of the Catalogue for Philanthropy. While balancing school work and her practice schedule, she facilitates sexual health and nutrition education programs in 4 DC middle schools. She has also served as a key contributor to TGP’s new nutrition curriculum. In this blog, she reflects on what she has learned through her work with TGP.

As a student-athlete, and a runner in particular, I often experience a difficult relationship with nutrition. On important workout days, I will often catch myself not eating past a certain time in the day, morning runs are often completed without any fuel in my body, and often the number of calories I burn throughout a day are not replaced throughout my daily meals. Often it is not malicious, rather there may not be a suitable amount of time to eat full meals between practices, classes, meetings, weight room, etc.

unspecified-1While I intellectually understand the importance of healthy eating, especially for competitive performance both on the track and in the classroom, I still struggle with nutrition. I remember learning about food groups in school, have had access to team presentations regarding nutrition, and have done plenty of my own research regarding the best types and combinations of food to put in my body to help me run faster, but I still struggle with providing nutrients to my body.

I believe that having the tools that Grassroots teaches to middle school students is something that all college athletes (and individuals generally) could have greatly benefited from when we were in middle school.

As Grassroots coaches, my fellow athletes and I often reflect that very few of us were ever exposed to the in-depth, interactive, and unique sexual health literacy that we provide to 6th graders that focuses on empowering students with the ability to make informed, healthy, and confident decisions about their health. This semester, we have expanded the “Grassroots pipeline” to pilot 7th grade nutrition and physical health. The curriculum provides students with the facts: what nutrients your body needs, what constitutes “healthy,” and why certain foods like Takis are unhealthy.

However, what makes Grassroots different is its ability to bridge the gap between understanding information and applying it to personal autonomy. Not a single one of our coaches can stand up in front of kids and preach that they should never have a bag of chips or an extra cookie at dinner; it would be unrealistic and hypocritical. Rather, we teach students about balance and what steps you can take to level out an unhealthy decision. Most importantly, we link every nutrient with the function it provides in the body, and we show what really happens when you are missing that function. In Practice 3 of our new nutrition curriculum, for example, we play a relay game in which students connect the ways protein, carbs, and vitamins and minerals fuel your everyday actions, and the students see what happens when you are missing any single one.

As an athlete and a college student, I still am learning some of our curriculum pieces and making those connections for myself. I am grateful that I get to be a part of an organization that is equipping young people to hold more agency in their lives, especially when I see what I hope to be budding female athletes that will be better equipped to confront the challenges of being a female athlete? it’s incredible to think of what records they may break.

Aspire Counseling — 40 Years of Mental Health!

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For forty years, Aspire Counseling, a mental health non-profit based in Gaithersburg, has been helping Montgomery County residents grow, change, and thrive.

It began in 1978 with Maryrose Rogolsky and a small, rented office in the Rockville Seventh-day Adventist Church. Rogolsky, lovingly known as “Posey,” set out with a vision to start an agency specializing in low cost, high-quality mental health care, to children in need. From that room, Posey and her three staff members founded what was then known as the Child Center and began their legacy and transformed access to affordable mental health care in Montgomery County.

Posey was a true visionary. She served children during a time when there was little recognition of children’s mental health needs. She bravely did battle with insurance companies that questioned how a child of six years could be experiencing emotional problems. Fast forward 40 years and it can be very difficult to find an appointment with a child therapist, especially if you are uninsured and face financial and cultural barriers.

“With a firm foundation based on the belief that all individuals, regardless of race, age and income, deserve access to affordable, evidence-based, excellent mental health care she built an organization that has helped thousands overcome personal mental health challenges,” said Carrie Zilcoski, Aspire’s Executive Director.

Over its 40 years, the Child Center evolved, expanding to become Child Center and Adult Services, and now Aspire Counseling, but it continues to be guided by Posey’s vision. “What would Posey have done?” has become a mantra as Aspire’s staff continue to adapt to Montgomery County’s, and society’s, ever-changing needs.

In 2018, Aspire Counseling’s Main Clinic is on pace to set a record of 1,400 unique patient encounters and nearly the same volume of patients in the community. Aspire’s newest program has brought services back into schools, training hundreds of educators and school employees on becoming a Trauma-Informed School with a goal of placing therapists in each school who specialize in trauma and helping students who have experienced Adverse Childhood Events.

Aspire Counseling also offers programs dedicated to new mothers who are suffering from or at risk for postpartum depression. The Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies program connects families to community services and provides a therapist who will make 12, no-cost, home therapy visits.

Committed to transforming lives and building resilience regardless of ability to pay, Aspire has found its place in Montgomery County’s growing and diverse community. To learn more visit we-aspire.org or call (301) 978-9750. Regardless of the challenges, you’re facing or your ability to pay, Aspire is here for you.

 

The Friends of Guest House Family

Volunteer at PlayStacey Picard has been a volunteer with Friends of Guest House since 2016. Her experience:

I first connected with Friends of Guest House when it kept coming up in conversation with various people not related to each other, and I thought maybe I should pay attention. That was just over a year ago. In the time since, I’ve taught several classes, coached a few of the women one-on-one for job interviews and speaking events, and most recently, I became a mentor.

To walk in the front door at Guest House is to be welcomed into the family, by both the women and the staff. In spite of all that is happening at any given moment in a residential program that houses more than two dozen women, in spite of the myriad details of coordinating meetings, classes, appointments, a stream of volunteers, and an occasional crisis response, there is never a hint of the “transactional” business that is taking place. Instead, it feels like stopping by an old friend’s house.

I once read that “healing” is not to be “cured” of something, but rather to be welcomed fully back into the community. This is the business and the blessing of Guest House. At Guest House, each woman who walks in the door is treated with the same warmth and respect we all hope to receive when we are at our lowest moment.

For many of them, it’s the first time they’ve encountered this simple act of kindness and respect that many of us might easily take for granted. It’s the first time they’ve been seen as fully human, with all the gifts and flaws, and pain and joy, and achievements and mistakes that everyone has.

The challenge at Guest House is not to see the women as worthy of every good thing life has to offer, it’s to help them see it in themselves. And that’s not easy when someone’s sense of self-worth has been shaped by trauma or addiction or experiencing first-hand the for-profit business of prisons in America today. It takes time, and it’s messy, but this is the essential work.

So in my experience, the role of mentoring is not so much about imparting some life lesson or wisdom, or about coaching a specific skill or making progress toward some defined goal or life plan. Those things will happen. It’s really more about meeting them where they are at any given moment. It’s about sitting with them, being fully present and authentic, generously listening without judgement, and gently reminding them, over time, that they are just in the middle of their story, that their conviction is only one event in one point in time, not the defining ending, that they are so much more than their worst mistake and that they are worthy and deserving of a full life.

Because they are.

-Stacey Picard, Friend of Guest House

CFP Executive Director Bob Wittig Shares Three Ways to Join the Collective Giving Movement

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Recently, I was invited to be the keynote speaker at the Giving Circle of Hope’s event. One of the topics I was asked to speak about was the role and impact of collective giving.

Collective giving aggregates all-sizes of donations. Pooling together donations of $25, $50, or $100 can quickly add up to thousands of dollars and together have a greater impact for the recipient nonprofit.

Collective giving is an emerging force of philanthropy in our country. It is helping to democratize and diversify philanthropy, engage new donors, and increase local giving.

As we enter the season of giving, here are three ways you can join the collective-giving movement:

  1. Join a Giving Circle. Giving Circles are one of the fastest forms of collective giving in the United States. Since 2007, the number of Giving Circles in the US has tripled and it’s estimated that nearly $1.5 billion has been donated to the nonprofit sector by Giving Circles over the past 10 years and that number continues to grow dramatically. Being part of a Giving Circle is a terrific way to give back, pool your donation with others for grantmaking, and meet like-minded people who want to do good through philanthropic efforts.
  2. Give on Giving Days. Giving Days, such as Giving Tuesday and Do More 24, are opportunities to donate with thousands of others over a specified period of time. Giving Tuesday is on November 27th this year and many nonprofits participate in this day of giving all across the country. In the DC region, the Catalogue for Philanthropy is the Giving Tuesday community leader and will feature and promote over 200 nonprofits.
  3. Start a GoFundMe or Facebook Campaign. Another way to join the collective giving movement is to set up a donation page for a cause that you support and invite people to reach a giving goal. I’ve seen more Facebook users ask their connections to donate money to a cause instead of giving birthday or wedding presents.

If you already donate to a cause, collective giving may be a way for you to leverage your giving with others. If you don’t currently give to a cause, collective giving might be a great place to launch your career in philanthropy!

To learn about amazing nonprofits in your area check out the Catalogue for Philanthropy where you will find over 400+ nonprofits. Each nonprofit’s programs and financials have been vetted before earning the Catalogue’s seal.

Join the movement!

Join Britepaths and the Financial Empowerment Center at South County in offering a warm welcome to our very first cohort of students in our Healthcare Pre-Apprenticeship Training Pilot Program!

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The Program offers the necessary foundation for Fairfax County residents to pursue better-paying jobs in the healthcare fields where there is a great need for skilled workers. It is a pilot program formed in partnership between Britepaths/Financial Empowerment Center at South County (FECSoCo) and Fairfax County’s Department of Housing and Community Development and is funded through the Fairfax County Community Funding Pool. Initial client recruitment is focused on Department of Housing clients in the South County area.

Britepaths’ FEC Workforce Development Coordinator Sally Meyer and Housing Services Specialist III Lura Bratcher hosted information sessions in June and July at the Westford Community Center in Alexandria, and our first students were recruited from these sessions. Future offerings may include training in other fields, such as construction and information technology.

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The first cohort began their 12-week session on September 10. The 10 students attend classes Monday through Friday. Britepaths’?Adult Basic Education Instructor Kristie Kleha provides their primary instruction, incorporating job readiness skills with the enrichment of math, reading, and writing that are contextualized for healthcare.

The students also have sessions each week in Financial Literacy with volunteers from FECSoCo and in computer skills training with our partners from Computer C.O.R.E. Other enrichment opportunities include a visit to Northern Virginia Community College’s Clinical Simulation Lab, an overview of medical certifications that NVCC offers, guidance in applying for grants to fund their future training, and guest speakers who present professional options in healthcare. The students also use this time to research and take an interest assessment to help them determine whether to pursue work with patients or in administration.

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After the 12-week session, students will enroll in a medical training course of their choice at a healthcare provider site. This class will also prepare them to take a certification exam.

Throughout the experience, and up to a year after completion, students are matched with a volunteer success mentor who will support them, provide resources, refer them to community supports if needed, and work with them to find and stay in a job.

We are excited for our students and wish them much success in their journey toward new careers!

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We would like to thank Fairfax County, the Department of Housing, Computer C.O.R.E., Northern Virginia Community College, and all the community partners, guest speakers, and volunteers who are supporting the launch of this pilot.

We are also reminded of our dear friend and long-time volunteer Diane Jenkins, who helped inspire and inform our initial proposal for this program. Diane was a retired Department of Housing Specialist who worked throughout her career to help her clients improve their lives. She passed away in July 2018, and it is heartening that her memory will live on through the success of students in this Program.

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Catalogue for Philanthropy Expands Resources to All Nonprofits With Online Learning Commons

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Washington — Nov. 8, 2018 — The Catalogue for Philanthropy: Greater Washington, which is beginning its 16th year as the only locally-focused guide to giving, is growing its efforts to help the entire nonprofit community, no matter the size or location of the organization.

The Catalogue is launching the online Learning Commons to further its belief in the power of nonprofits and the need to invest in effective and efficient management in order to increase their impact.

The online Learning Commons builds on the Catalogue’s existing in-person training sessions for nonprofit leaders. The web-enabled version is a capacity building and professional development program that covers five core topics important to nonprofit management: Board Development, Communications, Development, Program Evaluation, and Volunteer Management.

The Learning Commons, created by nonprofit professionals, offers a whole set of services, ranging from a thank you letter template and a short video refresher on the key elements of a thank you letter, to an entire workshop about how to steward donors. It’s free to nonprofits vetted and featured in the Catalogue and offered at minimal cost to other nonprofits.

Bob Wittig, executive director, Catalogue for Philanthropy, says, “Our number one goal is that our content and support is realistic given the other demands and resource limitations nonprofit leaders are facing. The online Learning Commons is action-oriented and designed to drive real change.”

The Catalogue seeks to create visibility for its network of charities, fuel their growth with philanthropic dollars, and create a movement for social good in the region. The Catalogue has raised over $40 million for its network of small, community-based charities in the Washington region and provides capacity building programs to support the mission and growth of the nonprofit community.

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Around Town Veterans Day Edition

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Thursday, November 8, 2018
All-In Tournament to End Veteran Homelessness

Operation Renewed Hope Foundation

Show your support for ending Veteran homelessness by turning out to our Veteran’s All-In Tournament.

When: Thursday, November 18, 2018
Where: Belle Haven Country Club, Alexandria, VA
Fee: $250 each; $275 at the door
Contact: Maria Coakley David, (703) 593-8791, mcdavid@cjcoakley.com
For more information

Thursday, November 8, 2018

YRF’s 10th Annual Gala: The Roots of the Ribbon
Yellow Ribbon Fund

DC’s Dancing Stars Gala is an exciting new fundraising event full of all the fun, glitz and glamour of the hit TV show Dancing with the Stars! Local DC Celebrities will learn a polished choreographed routine and perform at the Gala with a professional dance partner in a competition mirroring the television show. A panel of celebrity judges along with the audience will select the winner who will win the coveted mirror ball trophy and $10,000 for the charity of their choice. The gala will include a VIP cocktail reception, a sit-down gourmet dinner, the competition, a silent auction, professional performances, and a live band.

When: Saturday, November 10, 2018 (6:00 PM)
Where: The Ritz-Carlton, Tyson’s Corner, 1700 Tysons Boulevard, McLean, VA 22102
Fee: $375 VIP; $175 General Admission
Contact: Maria Coakley David, (703) 593-8791, mcdavid@cjcoakley.com

More information

Saturday, November 10, 2018
DC Dancing Stars Gala
Operation Renewed Hope Foundation

DC’s Dancing Stars Gala is an exciting new fundraising event full of all the fun, glitz and glamour of the hit TV show Dancing with the Stars! Local DC Celebrities will learn a polished choreographed routine and perform at the Gala with a professional dance partner in a competition mirroring the television show. A panel of celebrity judges along with the audience will select the winner who will win the coveted mirror ball trophy and $10,000 for the charity of their choice. The gala will include a VIP cocktail reception, a sit-down gourmet dinner, the competition, a silent auction, professional performances, and a live band.

When: Saturday, November 10, 2018 (6:00 PM)
Where: The Ritz-Carlton, Tyson’s Corner, 1700 Tysons Boulevard, McLean, VA 22102
Fee: $375 VIP; $175 General Admission
Contact: Maria Coakley David, (703) 593-8791, mcdavid@cjcoakley.com

For more information

Sunday, November 11, 2018
UNFCU Foundation’s 5K Run/Walk
Operation Renewed Hope Foundation

Help outrace poverty on Sunday 11 November at our first annual 5K Run/ Walk in Tysons Corner, Virginia. If you wish to compete, you can do so individually or as a team. Participants 17 years of age or younger can participate in a One Mile Fun Run. Registration will start at 7:30 am. The 5K and 1 mile walk/ run will start at 8:30 am.

When: Sunday, November 11, 2018
Where: United Nations Federal Credit Union, 8251 Greensboro Dr., Mclean, VA 22101

Fee: UNFCU Foundation will use proceeds from this event to support projects dedicated to eradicating extreme poverty. In honor of Veterans Day, a portion of the proceeds will also be donated to Operation Renewed Hope Foundation.

Contact: Maria Coakley David, (703) 593-8791, mcdavid@cjcoakley.com

For more information

Catalogue for Philanthropy Highlights Washington-Area Nonprofits That Support Vets and Their Families

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WASHINGTON — Nov. 7, 2017 — Veterans Day is an important time to thank those who’ve served their country; many nonprofits in the greater Washington area find ways to keep this gratitude going throughout the year for vets and military families.

The Catalogue for Philanthropy, Washington’s trusted “go to” source for finding organizations with meaningful impact, has compiled a list of charities serving local veterans and their families.

The Catalogue, a nonprofit that has raised over $40 million for small nonprofits in the D.C. region at no cost to those organizations, has vetted these charities in a thorough process that involves a program review, financial review and site visit. This means donors can feel confident that they are supporting organizations that make the Washington region a better place to live for everyone.

All Catalogue nonprofits are locally based which enables donors to give where they live. To initially apply to the Catalogue, an organization must have a budget of between $100,000 and $4 million.

The full Veterans Day list is at http://bit.ly/2CZEaYE. Many of the nonprofits include volunteer opportunities in their descriptions.

  • Our Military Kids (www.cfp-dc.org/militarykids) provides small grants to help families pay for extracurricular activities when a parent is overseas and supports children of wounded warriors from all military branches.
  • Operation Renewed Hope Foundation (www.cfp-dc.org/orhf) helps homeless and at-risk veterans secure safe, permanent homes and overcome the root causes of homelessness and instability in their lives.
  • Operation Second Chance (www.cfp-dc.org/osc) provides direct support to those in financial crisis due to combat injury or illness, usually during the gap between active duty pay and the initiation of veterans’ benefits. The nonprofit also will be sending care packages to 50 deployed service members and will be part of a fundraiser Nov. 10.
  • ThanksUSA (www.cfp-dc.org/thanksusa) empowers military families — children and spouses of military personnel — through its scholarship program to expand their education and skills through college, technical school or vocational training programs.
  • The Veterans Consortium (http://cfp-dc.org/vet) provides free legal services to over 400 veterans and their families each year, ensuring equal access to justice in court and achieving favorable outcomes in 80 percent of its cases. The organization will be holding a discharge upgrade clinic Nov. 9, at the Washington Convention Center.
  • Yellow Ribbon Fund (http://cfp-dc.org/Yellow-Ribbon) provides practical high-touch support to wounded, ill, and injured service members, their caregivers and families in the D.C. area at Walter Reed and Fort Belvoir as they transition back to their homes and communities. The nonprofit is connected to a number of upcoming events that support its mission.

 

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“Community Leaders Share Their Stories”

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Story Tapestries will present a unique invitation-only event, called Threads of Change: Supporting Our Stories, to present the first annual Community Voices Awards and to launch their presence in The Catalogue for Philanthropy: Greater Washington. The event will be hosted at the appointment-only Dennis and Phillip Ratner Museum in Bethesda, Maryland on November 13, 2018, from 6:30pm to 8:30pm.

During this visually and emotionally stimulating event, Story Tapestries will also recognize the following honorees for their dedication to unity through the arts:

Carol Trawick, Founder of the Trawick Foundation Fred Brown, Civil Rights Activist Mimi Hassanein, Office of Community Partnerships and Activist Regie Cabico, Award-winning Poet, Performing and Teaching Artist Willkie Farr & Gallagher, LLP

In addition, two local students will be recognized for their contributions and involvement in Amplify US! Initiative. Amplify US! is a community-driven initiative designed to use the arts to build cultural bridges.

Story Tapestries, headquartered in Germantown, Maryland, was founded in 2010 by international performing and teaching artist, Arianna Ross. “Story Tapestries truly believes in the power of the arts to empower, educate and engage. This year is our first annual presentation of the Community Voices Awards to honor community members and leaders who represent the three core values of Story Tapestries: Empower, Educate, Engage. The moment arrived for Story Tapestries to create a time and space for these unique voices to be heard and to shine light on their incredible impact.”

The Catalogue for Philanthropy: Greater Washington has selected Story Tapestries, Inc. to be part of the Class of 2018-19. The Catalogue has recognized how Story Tapestries uses the power of the Arts woven with STEM, Literacy, Social Development, and other strategies to educate and empower communities to develop blueprints for success. This year the Catalogue celebrates its 16th anniversary: since its inception, it has raised $40 million for nonprofits in the region. It also offers trainings, neighborhood-based opportunities for collaboration, and a speakers series for individuals who want to learn about and engage with the needs, challenges, and accomplishments of our shared community. “People want to know where to give and they need trusted information. Based on our in-depth review, we believe that Story Tapestries, Inc. is one of the best community-based nonprofits in the region,” says Bob Wittig, Executive-Director of the Catalogue for Philanthropy. You can visit the Catalogue at: https://www.cfp- dc.org/nonprofits/1723/Story-Tapestries-Inc/

About Story Tapestries:

Story Tapestries promotes the power of storytelling to introduce positive change in the community, and empowers educators across the globe to creatively weave music, dance and other art forms into language arts, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields. These practices are used to help individuals overcome economic, cultural and emotional barriers. For more information, listen to the radio show, “A Kind Voice,” which recently interviewed Arianna where she discussed Story Tapestries’ initiative on Global Giving to use arts-based methods to approach STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) education. You can hear to the full interview here: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/akindvoice/2018/10/25/a-kind-voice-radio–arianna-ross). Learn more by visiting: www.storytapestries.org.

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For more information, contact: Lorienne Beals, Development Director development@storytapestries.org